Posts Tagged ‘alcoholic beverages’

Florida’s Key West To Get First Legal Distillery

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Key West, Florida, once a haven for rum smugglers during the Prohibition era, is set to get its first legal distillery with the debut of , a new craft spirits company.The brainchild of chef and professional kiteboarder Paul Menta, Chef Distilled is located in a 2,500-square-foot former Coca-Cola bottling plant and plans to begin operations early next month. Menta says initial production will be around eight to 10 110-bottle batches a week.

Chef Distilled’s first offering will be a white rum called Legal Rum (around $22), which will initially be available in the South Florida market, handled by Opici Family Distributing. Menta hopes to start shipping to retail by November. “Legal Rum will be our bread and butter, because that’s what the distributor is concerned about and what everyone wants,” says Menta, adding that additional rum entries—including locally sourced flavor infusions and other specialties—will be available onsite at the distillery. Offshoots currently being considered include vanilla crème brûlée and Spanish lime infusions, and Menta is also planning on launching a “raw” rum bottled straight from the still, as well as a barrel-aged offering.

Chef Distilled’s launch follows the recent passage of a new law allowing Florida craft distilleries to sell directly to the public. The legislation, which went into effect this summer, limits sales to two bottles a year per consumer and defines a craft distiller as producing less than 75,000 gallons annually.

Alcohol News : Urban Outfitters Applies For Liquor License In Planned Williamsburg Location in New York

Urban Outfitters applies for liquor license - servingalcohol.comUrban Outfitters plan to open up shop in Williamsburg complete with a fully stocked bar is not off to the greatest start. If a city councilman gets his way, every hipster’s favorite clothing store will be as dry as, well, a normal clothing store when they finally open in Brooklyn.

It seems this planned Urban Outfitters where someone could potentially buy clothes and top the purchase off with a drink will face some stiff competition before it opens. One city councilman is already fighting the plans to serve liquor and leggings in the same location. “I can’t think of a circumstance for which it would be appropriate for Urban Outfitters to have a liquor license,” Greenpoint city councilman Stephen Levin told the New York Daily News, before positing probably the greatest question ever asked by a civic official: “We must ask ourselves, ‘Do we really want people drunk when they are buying their skinny jeans and ironic t-shirts?'”

As it stands, people looking to shop at Urban Outfitters for whatever hipster uniform they’re hawking this month have to trudge all the way to Manhattan. But that changed when, in March, Crain’s reported the store’s plans to open  — where else — on North Sixth Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The jokes about an Urban Outfitters in Williamsburg practically wrote themselves. Then, in March, Grub Street New York noticed the store was planning to apply for a liquor license. The Urban Outfitters in Williamsburg was to have a bar. Because of course, is why. Sure enough, Urban Outfitters was among the astonishing 106 liquor license applications received by the Williamsburg and Greenpoint Community Board 1 in September. (Most are renewals, but there are 37 new applications including Urban Outfitters.)

Now we have to wait and see how this campaign plays out. There’s a long bureaucratic process that will have to resolve itself before Urban Outfitters learns whether or not they can sling whiskey beside their hot pants. The next hurdle is a meeting with the board’s liquor authority review committee on October 3.

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As 2011 Approaches, Booze Comes Back

Source: CNBC
Tuesday, 12 Oct 2010
As 2011 approaches, booze is back.
And that’s good news for the alcohol business, which is $188 billion strong.
Alcohol sales were once called recession-resistant. But the financial crisis hurt just about every segment of the consumer culture, so now, industry experts call it recession-resilient.
Trends are strong in wine and spirits, and even though the volume of beer sold is down, revenue is not off as much because of price increases.
A lot of Americans still choose to have a drink at home rather than go out, but even that trend is starting to shift.
“As the worst of the economic situation appears to be over, and confidence is returning, consumer traffic is up,” said Mike Ginley from Next Level Marketing.
“Most of the major restaurant chains are reporting same-store sales gains now, and that’s a very good sign going into 2011.”
At the US Drinks Conference in New York City, however, there is considerable disagreement over whether another trend continues: The trade-down.

Read the full story here.

Michigan: Maintain alcohol regulations

Source: Detroit Free Press

BY LOYCE LESTER AND CURTIS WILLIAMS

Jun 30th

“Don’t let the sparkle and smooth taste of wine deceive you. For in the end it bites like a poisonous serpent; it stings like a viper.”

That’s a saying from Proverbs. Yet Jesus turned water into wine when it ran out at a wedding. Wine is taken as a remembrance of our savior’s blood, yet too much wine is the downfall of kings.

Mountains of biblical scholarship, debating the meaning of Hebrew and Greek words, have been devoted to parsing the good book’s stance on alcohol. However, Americans have generally agreed that moderation is the key to healthy, moral living.

Our local regulations on alcohol reflect that view. Beer, wine and spirits may be only sold in licensed locations at appropriate hours, and drinking too much will land you in jail, particularly if you decide to get behind the wheel. These laws are the embodiment of our local values and serve to protect innocent citizens from the poor judgment caused by drunkenness.

These laws and our values are now under attack, besieged by corporate greed. Unfortunately, Michigan is on the front lines.

Major brewers and wineries as well as big-box retailers have filed a barrage of lawsuits against state and local governments that threaten to unravel the very alcohol regulations that keep our streets safe, keep our children healthy and protect our values. Without federal legislation clarifying the states’ legal authority to regulate alcohol sales (known as the Comprehensive Alcohol Regulatory Effectiveness Act, or CARE), profit-hungry corporate interests will inevitably overturn these laws and invite a new epidemic of alcoholism in America.

Michigan has been at the epicenter of this showdown between community values and the foreign-owned alcohol producers and giant retailers. A Supreme Court ruling, Granholm v. Heald, has been intentionally mischaracterized by producers and retailers as calling into question the states’ 21st Amendment right to regulate the sale and distribution of alcohol in favor of businesses’ right to engage in unrestricted interstate commerce.

Citing the Granholm decision, retailers, brewers and wineries have gone on the legal offensive, filing 26 separate lawsuits in an effort to overturn state and local laws regulating alcohol. As recently as 2008, a Florida-based retailer successfully sued the Michigan government and overturned more regulations regarding the distribution of alcohol. The judge in this case cited the Granholm decision.

The result of repealing these regulations is clear. Retailers and brewers will sell more alcohol at often cut-rate prices to more people, including minors.

The current laws establish a strict regime in which the state can effectively monitor alcohol sales, ensure that alcohol is safe, distributed to responsible retailers, restaurants and bars, and not sold to minors. These laws also establish an independent third party

– wholesalers – that block incentives from retailers and brewers to encourage binge drinking through deep discounts or even loss-leading practices.

Without these laws, alcohol will be sold just like bottled water.

Why wouldn’t we desire such an outcome? Retailers and brewers would make larger profits without being bothered by regulations. However, studies have shown that increasing the availability of alcohol encourages more irresponsible drinking, including underage drinking. Studies have also shown that the more outlets selling alcohol, the greater the number of alcohol-related violence and automobile accidents.

England provides the most frightening case study. After virtually eliminating alcohol regulations in 2005, alcohol became widely available at heavily discounted prices. Often, beer was priced below water in grocery stores. As a result, police have reported higher rates of alcohol-related violent behavior, underage drinking and binge drinking.

Our ministries put us in daily contact with the least fortunate in our communities, many of whom battle serious alcohol-related problems. We work tirelessly to provide a loving, caring, safe haven for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, helping them to understand that they are loved, that God forgives them, and that they can rebuild their lives. It is difficult to imagine that our court system would allow the profit motives of large corporations to grow the rolls of those afflicted by the terrible disease of alcoholism.

State governments are no match for the well-funded legal assault that is bent on alcohol deregulation. Federal legislation is essential. By clarifying the states’ 21st Amendment right to regulate alcohol, the CARE Act of 2010 would stop the legal onslaught that threatens to plunge many more Americans into alcoholism.

Our health, future and community values are dependent on this legislation.

The Rev. Dr. Loyce Lester is pastor of Original New Grace Baptist Church in Detroit. The Rev. Curtis Williams is pastor of Aijalon Baptist Church in Detroit.

Source: Detroit Free PressBY LOYCE LESTER AND CURTIS WILLIAMSJun 30th”Don’t let the sparkle and smooth taste of wine deceive you. For in the end it bites like a poisonous serpent; it stings like a viper.”That’s a saying from Proverbs. Yet Jesus turned water into wine when it ran out at a wedding. Wine is taken as a remembrance of our savior’s blood, yet too much wine is the downfall of kings.Mountains of biblical scholarship, debating the meaning of Hebrew and Greek words, have been devoted to parsing the good book’s stance on alcohol. However, Americans have generally agreed that moderation is the key to healthy, moral living.Our local regulations on alcohol reflect that view. Beer, wine and spirits may be only sold in licensed locations at appropriate hours, and drinking too much will land you in jail, particularly if you decide to get behind the wheel. These laws are the embodiment of our local values and serve to protect innocent citizens from the poor judgment caused by drunkenness.These laws and our values are now under attack, besieged by corporate greed. Unfortunately, Michigan is on the front lines.Major brewers and wineries as well as big-box retailers have filed a barrage of lawsuits against state and local governments that threaten to unravel the very alcohol regulations that keep our streets safe, keep our children healthy and protect our values. Without federal legislation clarifying the states’ legal authority to regulate alcohol sales (known as the Comprehensive Alcohol Regulatory Effectiveness Act, or CARE), profit-hungry corporate interests will inevitably overturn these laws and invite a new epidemic of alcoholism in America.Michigan has been at the epicenter of this showdown between community values and the foreign-owned alcohol producers and giant retailers. A Supreme Court ruling, Granholm v. Heald, has been intentionally mischaracterized by producers and retailers as calling into question the states’ 21st Amendment right to regulate the sale and distribution of alcohol in favor of businesses’ right to engage in unrestricted interstate commerce.Citing the Granholm decision, retailers, brewers and wineries have gone on the legal offensive, filing 26 separate lawsuits in an effort to overturn state and local laws regulating alcohol. As recently as 2008, a Florida-based retailer successfully sued the Michigan government and overturned more regulations regarding the distribution of alcohol. The judge in this case cited the Granholm decision.The result of repealing these regulations is clear. Retailers and brewers will sell more alcohol at often cut-rate prices to more people, including minors.The current laws establish a strict regime in which the state can effectively monitor alcohol sales, ensure that alcohol is safe, distributed to responsible retailers, restaurants and bars, and not sold to minors. These laws also establish an independent third party- wholesalers – that block incentives from retailers and brewers to encourage binge drinking through deep discounts or even loss-leading practices.Without these laws, alcohol will be sold just like bottled water.Why wouldn’t we desire such an outcome? Retailers and brewers would make larger profits without being bothered by regulations. However, studies have shown that increasing the availability of alcohol encourages more irresponsible drinking, including underage drinking. Studies have also shown that the more outlets selling alcohol, the greater the number of alcohol-related violence and automobile accidents.England provides the most frightening case study. After virtually eliminating alcohol regulations in 2005, alcohol became widely available at heavily discounted prices. Often, beer was priced below water in grocery stores. As a result, police have reported higher rates of alcohol-related violent behavior, underage drinking and binge drinking.Our ministries put us in daily contact with the least fortunate in our communities, many of whom battle serious alcohol-related problems. We work tirelessly to provide a loving, caring, safe haven for people struggling with alcohol and drug addiction, helping them to understand that they are loved, that God forgives them, and that they can rebuild their lives. It is difficult to imagine that our court system would allow the profit motives of large corporations to grow the rolls of those afflicted by the terrible disease of alcoholism.State governments are no match for the well-funded legal assault that is bent on alcohol deregulation. Federal legislation is essential. By clarifying the states’ 21st Amendment right to regulate alcohol, the CARE Act of 2010 would stop the legal onslaught that threatens to plunge many more Americans into alcoholism.Our health, future and community values are dependent on this legislation.The Rev. Dr. Loyce Lester is pastor of Original New Grace Baptist Church in Detroit. The Rev. Curtis Williams is pastor of Aijalon Baptist Church in Detroit.

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Off-Premise Wine Sales Increase in June

Source: WineBusiness.com

July 10th

Off-premise wine sales data increased 2.2 percent from the same period last year in the four weeks ending June 26 according to The Nielsen Company-tracked data. In the 13 weeks ending June 26, sales were up 3.1 percent.

Domestic wine sales increased 3.6 percent while imported wine sales declined 1.3 percent in the 4 weeks ending June 26. In the 13 weeks ending in the same period, domestic sales increased 4.8 percent while imported wine decreased 1.2 percent.

Most of the growth took place in the over $20 price segment, which increased 14.6 percent in the 4 weeks and 12.3 percent in the 13 weeks ending June 26. Segments showing modertate growth include the $9-11.99, $12-14.99 and $15-19.99 price points.

Wine sales in the $0-2.99 and $6-8.99 price points declined in June. In the 4 weeks ending June 26, wine sales fell 2.7 percent in the $0-2.99 price segment and fell 3.6 percent in the $6-8.99 category.

Source: WineBusiness.com  July 10th
Off-premise wine sales data increased 2.2 percent from the same period last year in the four weeks ending June 26 according to The Nielsen Company-tracked data. In the 13 weeks ending June 26, sales were up 3.1 percent.Domestic wine sales increased 3.6 percent while imported wine sales declined 1.3 percent in the 4 weeks ending June 26. In the 13 weeks ending in the same period, domestic sales increased 4.8 percent while imported wine decreased 1.2 percent.Most of the growth took place in the over $20 price segment, which increased 14.6 percent in the 4 weeks and 12.3 percent in the 13 weeks ending June 26. Segments showing modertate growth include the $9-11.99, $12-14.99 and $15-19.99 price points.Wine sales in the $0-2.99 and $6-8.99 price points declined in June. In the 4 weeks ending June 26, wine sales fell 2.7 percent in the $0-2.99 price segment and fell 3.6 percent in the $6-8.99 category.

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