Learn to manage Serving Environments with Alcohol Course

The way weekend fun is important for everyone, the staff at the bars have their professional responsibility for alcohol sales and service. There are specific courses like Bartender Skills training, Alcohol Course, and Food Safety Courses. Let us see specifics of two of these courses in this blog post.

Manage Serving Environments

This program is for servers/bar staff related to the sale and consumption of alcohol. It includes details relates to selling alcohol to minors, intoxicated, possibly impaired, or poly-impaired persons. The intention of the course is to prevent possible impairment, underage drinking, and drunk driving. The program is also known as Alcohol Course.

In some states, there are primary requirements which one has to complete before taking this certification course. It is mandatory to many bars and restaurants to work as a staff with them. The industry experts collaborating with you is the most important part of this course. It relates to your learning and training desires and managing the establishments professionally. A certificate from a premier institute shows your commitment to your business and readiness for responsible business practices.

Along with the course, you get frequent updates to course material and a library of resources which is helpful for your business. Like any other professional course, you get a chance to collaborate with peers from different establishments. The course coordinators make sure you pass the certification.

Bartender Training Course

If you or your staff is engaged in serving drinks, this course is important. There are specific skills you need to gain to work in this industry. Some reputed training institute awards the Bartender Certification.

The course is available online and covers the topics listed below:

  • Bar Setup
  • Mixology
  • Beers, Wines, and Liquors
  • Glassware
  • Guest Service
  • Increasing Tips
  • Searching and Interviewing for a Job

Along with the course material, you receive links to additional resources to improve your skills. The online course is flexible, and you can complete it at your convenience. The course requires constant updates as per latest trends and industry information. At the end of your review and completion of training material, you get a Bartender Certification.

Serving Alcohol Inc provides all information related to these courses, and you can complete some of them online and some of the classroom courses. The courses are available in almost all the states in the US, and the Institute has 40 years of experience in this field. You can choose the course by State, and Serving Alcohol Inc. will provide you the necessary training through expert trainers and a certificate which has a value nationwide.

Bottle Service in Las Vegas Clubs (Should you get it?)

Be very careful when getting bottle service.  It takes the control over pouring away from the club employees.  This has led to many problems in the past and you should be careful when doing this.

Make sure you are drinking with a group that you trust. Talk before your night out about potential problems with over indulgence.  Decide how you can help people in your party maintain a good pace. Pick mixers that you can drink by themselves. Stagger alcohol drinks, meaning drink a water or other non-alcoholic drink between alcoholic drinks.  Stay safe and have fun.

Here is the info about bottle service in Las Vegas:

http://www.clubvivalasvegas.com/cat_bottle_service_-_what_it_is_and_when_to_order_it.cfm

 

Will self-serve beer render bartenders obsolete?

Are machines good listeners? Are robots replacing humans for customer service roles?  The younger generation don’t want to interact with other humans for fear of their reactions. People spend more time with machines than with people and this is creating a dangerous time in society. Our younger generation lacks the communication skills to interact with other people.
Some of the machines we are concerned about are the automatic beer dispensers. They have incorporated some mechanization to prohibited sales, they can’t oversee a situation that may have disastrous results for your establishment.  Switching to these mechanized dispensers, the manufactures are recommending that your staff’s duties would switch from the service of alcohol to the monitoring of alcohol consumption.  But, many alcohol serving establishments may choose to ignore the use of their staff purely for overseeing the environment.  Again, creating a unwanted and dangerous opportunity of social risk in society.

Machines lack the understanding of legal duty to care and machines don’t have the ability to give human compassion.

Attitudes are taking over the human race. Machines can stop working but employees can never stop caring. You save a great deal of employee service time with service machines that only need people to service them.  We are impatient with people even when people are caring and thoughtful.  The lack of human compassion and a love of money will increase the opportunity of risk by not knowing what to feel.  The amount of alcohol in a drink does not give us the ability to know the human reactions to the drinks, especially without sufficient alcohol training or alcohol certification.   Questions of over service of alcohol will be hard to answer when trying to take deposition from a machine. The opportunity of less caring in service creates less control in society.  Society may hold owners and manufacturers accountable for choosing profit over safety.

What are your thoughts?  Please, let us know if you have some ideas?

T.G.I. Friday’s Serves Alcoholic Root Beer to 8-Year-Old Boy

T.G.I.-Fridays-Serves-Alcoholic-Root-Beer-to-8-Year-Old-Boy-825x510“What do you call that? Throw up root beer?” the boy, Tyler Schwab, said in an interview with news station KTNV. “Because that’s what it tastes like.” The restaurant called it “an honest mistake.”

An 8-year-old boy who has a heart defect and who is prescribed ADHD medication was served an alcoholic beverage instead of root beer at a T.G.I Friday’s in Las Vegas.

The drink was served in The Orleans hotel-casino, according to KTNV.

Tyler Schwab said when he received the root beer, he took a few sips and then asked his mother to try it because it tasted bitter. Then, his dad grabbed the bottle and noticed it was an adult root beer.

“My fiance grabbed the bottle and started looking at it and saw that it said 5.9 percent alcohol content,” said mother Adrianna Schwab.

The boy’s parents said they don’t understand how the mistake could have happened because the alcoholic root beer bottle and the non-alcoholic root beer bottle look different.

Schwab said he was scared when he realized what he drank.

“He was really freaked out,” his mother said. “He asked me, am I going to die?”

The server and manager reportedly apologized to the family for the mistake and took the bottle away.

“They were apologetic but not as apologetic as they should have been for the circumstance it was,” his mother said.

T.G.I Friday’s gave the following statement:

“We are aware of an incident at our Orleans restaurant where a server accidentally served an adult root beer beverage to a minor. It was an honest mistake. We immediately addressed the situation with the guest directly and to the guests’ satisfaction. We are currently retraining staff on all operational procedures and responsible alcohol service standards to prevent a recurrence. The safety of our guests and team members is the utmost importance and our top priority.”

The manager said the incident happened because the bartender was new and was still training.


Brought to you bywww.ServingAlcohol.com.Online training and resources for bar and restaurant owners, managers, servers, waiters, waitresses.Offering Bartender License, Server Training Courses, Food Safety and Management courses.  We train safe service for responsible alcohol service

Americans are drinking themselves to death on alcohol at record rates

Martini ServingAlcohol.com

Alcohol is killing Americans at a rate not seen in at least 35 years, according to new federal data. Last year, more than 30,700 Americans died from alcohol-induced causes, including alcohol poisoning and cirrhosis, which is primarily caused by alcohol use.

In 2014, there were 9.6 deaths from these alcohol-induced causes per 100,000 people, an increase of 37 percent since 2002.
This tally of alcohol-induced fatalities excludes deaths from drunk driving, other accidents, and homicides committed under the influence of alcohol. If those numbers were included the annual toll of deaths directly or indirectly caused by alcohol would be closer to 90,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In recent years, public health experts have focused extensively on overdose deaths from heroin and prescription painkillers, which have risen rapidly since the early 2000s. But in 2014, more people died from alcohol-induced causes (30,722) than from overdoses of prescription painkillers and heroin combined (28,647), according to the CDC.Alcohol deaths ServingAlcohol.com

Philip J. Cook, a Duke University professor who studies alcohol consumption patterns and their effects, notes that per-capita alcohol consumption has been increasing since the late 1990s.

“Since the prevalence of heavy drinking tends to follow closely with per capita consumption, it is likely that one explanation for the growth in alcohol-related deaths is that more people are drinking more,” he wrote in an email.

The number of American adults who drink at least monthly rose by a small but significant amount between 2002 and 2014 — from 54.9 percent to 56.9 percent — according to data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The change has been especially pronounced among women. The percent of women drinking monthly or more rose from 47.9 in 2002 to 51.9 in 2014. And the percentage of women reporting binge drinking — defined as five or more drinks on at least one occasion — rose from 15.7 to 17.4 percent over the same period.

Cook notes that when you adjust the alcohol fatality rates for age, the increase narrows somewhat. That’s because older Americans are at more risk for alcohol-induced diseases, like cirrhosis, and the American population has gotten older over the past several decades. Once you adjust for age, the increase in alcohol-deaths “could plausibly be accounted for by the growth in per capita consumption,” Cook said.

The heaviest drinkers are at the greatest risk for the alcohol-induced causes of mortality charted above. And some drinkers consume plenty of alcohol indeed. Prior research by Cook indicates that the top 10 percent of American adults consume the lion’s share of alcohol in this country — close to 74 drinks a week on average.
Time for a drink ServingAlcohol.com
For people who drink less, alcohol’s effects on health are less clear-cut. A large body of research seems to indicate that moderate alcohol consumption — around a drink or two a day — is associated with decreased risk of mortality.

But with alcohol, the line between “moderate use” and “dangerous use” can be a thin one. A recent study quantified the risk of death associated with the use of a variety of common recreational drugs. They found that at the level of individual use, alcohol was the deadliest substance, followed by heroin and cocaine. The reason? The ratio between a toxic dose and a typical dose is extremely narrow with alcohol. If you’re happily buzzed at say, three drinks, three more might make you sick, and three after that may put you in alcohol poisoning territory.

For this reason, some researchers are starting to urge public health officials to focus more on the dangers posed by alcohol, and less on the dangers of less toxic drugs, like marijuana and LSD. One way to rein in problem drinking would be to simply raise federal alcohol taxes, which are currently at historically low levels.

By Christopher Ingraham December 22, 2015
Washington Post

 

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Online training and resources for bar and restaurant owners, managers, servers, waiters, waitresses.
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